Last edited by Bragami
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of influence of emotional valence on age differences in early processing and memory. found in the catalog.

influence of emotional valence on age differences in early processing and memory.

Ruthann Cheryl Thomas

influence of emotional valence on age differences in early processing and memory.

by Ruthann Cheryl Thomas

  • 107 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

A growing body of research suggests an age-related increase in the importance of positive emotional information, presumably due to older adults" desire to optimize current feelings. In the present study, older and younger adults" attentional biases and subsequent memory for positive, negative, and neutral information was examined in a procedure that required participants to ignore distracting emotional stimuli and then perform a subsequent recognition task for the ignored stimuli. Younger adults demonstrated an attentional bias for negative stimuli, but older adults attended equally to positive, negative, and neutral stimuli. However, a different pattern emerged in the recognition memory task. Although younger adults also demonstrated a bias to remember negative stimuli, older adults remembered positive stimuli better than negative and neutral stimuli. Thus, older adults" bias for positive emotional information appears to influence memory, but this bias cannot be detected early in the processing of emotional information.

The Physical Object
Pagination27 leaves.
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19512924M
ISBN 10061295577X

EATON, KIMBERLY LINHART. Memory and Emotion: The Influence of Valence on Children’s Memory for a Salient Event. (Under the direction of Lynne Baker-Ward.) Remembering is a constructive process. Children's memories for events have been shown to conform increasingly over time to script-based expectations, stereotypes and suggestions. Perception: Evidence for Multiple Stages of Processing Stephen D. Smith, Theresa A. McIver, Michelle S. J. Di Nella, and Michelle L. Crease Department of Psychology, University of Winnipeg Previous research has demonstrated that both emotional valence and arousal can influence the subjective experience of time.

Hypothesis 3: The same emotional valence (pleasant or unpleasant) expressed with high energy will lead to more contagion than if expressed with low energy. Influence of Emotional Contagion on Individual and Group Processes Figure 1 outlines a model of emotional contagion as devel-oped from the literature reviewed above. The final step is theFile Size: KB. In addition to the influence of emotional arousal, emotional valence may impact memory even in the absence of differences in arousal. For example, Adelman and Estes () found that positive and negative emotional valence enhanced memory even when the to-be-remembered items were words that were not arousing. Most stimuli with emotional valence.

  Conscious and Unconscious Cognitive Processing: The Priming affect of Semantic Relatedness and Emotional Valance. Research into cognitive psychology has challenged traditional notions on perception, as studies conclude information processing can be unconscious (Merikle, Smilek & Eastwood, ). Ad memory was not significantly impacted by the television program's emotional valence or intensity. We offer several processing explanations for these findings. Citation: Karen Russo France, Reshma H. Shah, and C. Whan Park (),"The Impact of Emotional Valence and Intensity on Ad Evaluation and Memory", in NA - Advances in Consumer.


Share this book
You might also like
Municipal race relations

Municipal race relations

The all England law reports.

The all England law reports.

Dallas & Fort Worth

Dallas & Fort Worth

Review of the Tanzania sugar industry, 1983/84.

Review of the Tanzania sugar industry, 1983/84.

Early Childhood Activity Program for Handicapped Children

Early Childhood Activity Program for Handicapped Children

Advances in Human Genetics, Volume 19 (Advances in Human Genetics)

Advances in Human Genetics, Volume 19 (Advances in Human Genetics)

A letter from a friend in Shropshire to his country-man Mr. Richard Baxter at his meeting-house in London

A letter from a friend in Shropshire to his country-man Mr. Richard Baxter at his meeting-house in London

Spelling Power Bound Version

Spelling Power Bound Version

guide to the Roman city of Uriconium, at Wroxeter, Shropshire.

guide to the Roman city of Uriconium, at Wroxeter, Shropshire.

Dangerous tunes

Dangerous tunes

Proposals for a freedom of information act and an open meetings (public bodies) act.

Proposals for a freedom of information act and an open meetings (public bodies) act.

The witch king

The witch king

Interior of Santa Croce

Interior of Santa Croce

Speech hearing and language

Speech hearing and language

Between two wars

Between two wars

Influence of emotional valence on age differences in early processing and memory by Ruthann Cheryl Thomas Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Influence of Emotional Valence on Age Differences in Early Processing and Memory. Much research in the field of cognitive aging is rooted in the information processing approach of experimental psychology wherein participants engage in basic cognitive tasks that attempt to isolate particular processes and control for additional factors that could influence by: The Influence of Individual Differences on Emotional Processing and Emotional Memory by Patricia Lynn Johnson A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts Department of Psychology College of Arts and Sciences University of South Florida Major Professor: Cynthia R.

Cimino, Ph.D. Effects of Emotional Valence and Arousal Upon Memory Trade-Offs & Janowsky, ). Despite these suggestions that age may not strongly influence the impact of valence and arousal on memory, there is other evidence that older adults show a “positiv- past studies investigating age differences in.

Emotional processing in patients with mild cognitive impairment: The influence of the valence and intensity of emotional stimuli: There were no significant age differences between the two groups (t (98) = −p > ).

Autti, M. SamsNeural processing of emotional valence of facial expressions. Open J. Neurosci., 2 (1) ( Cited by: 6. Age Differences in Memory for Arousing and Nonarousing Emotional Words Article in The Journals of Gerontology Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 63(1):P February with.

The influence of stimulus valence on perceptual processing of facial expressions and subsequent response inhibition Article in Psychophysiology 57(2) August with 50 Reads How we measure. Even the attempt to retrieve an emotional memory may establish the affective state necessary to influence the cognitive and neurobiological processes of retrieval (see Smith et al.,).

A partial reminder of an emotional event, such as a fragment of a conversation, may trigger a search process for an emotional event associated with the Cited by: Some of the international research undertaken, concerned differences in Emotional Processing and ageing.

Bucks, () investigated the association between emotional processing and ageing in a community sample in both the UK and Australia (Bucks, ). Start studying Chapter Emotional Influence on Learning and Memory. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

R.J. Dolan, in Encyclopedia of Neuroscience, Imaging Emotional Stimuli. Studies of human emotional processing using functional neuroimaging techniques have invested intensely in an experimental approach that involves presenting to healthy subjects stimuli that represent basic emotions as expressed in facial expressions of fear, anger, sadness, disgust, happiness, and surprise.

Contact D. Hill Jr. Library. 2 Broughton Drive Campus Box Raleigh, NC () James B. Hunt Jr. Library. Partners WayCited by: 1. THE INFLUENCE OF VALENCE AND AROUSAL ON REASONING: AFFECTIVE PRIMING IN THE SEMANTIC VERIFICATION TASK by copula (is/is not), quantifier (greater/less) and veracity (true/false) (e.g.

“45 is less than 61”). These sentences were chosen because of their complexity and the absence of any emotional content. Emotion can have a powerful effect on humans and animals. Numerous studies have shown that the most vivid autobiographical memories tend to be of emotional events, which are likely to be recalled more often and with more clarity and detail than neutral events.

The activity of emotionally enhanced memory retention can be linked to human evolution; during early development, responsive behavior. these different dimensions influence the neural processes recruited during the processing of an emotional event, with particular emphasis on examining how processing in the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is affected by stimulus valence and arousal.

The amygdala often responds preferentially to. of emotional memory networks at the systems level, providing an important translational bridge between animal models and clinical disorders. Emotion theorists often assume that affective space is parsed according to two orthogonal dimensions — arousal and valence.

The impact of these dimensions on different forms of memory, including declarative. have examined the influence of affective valence on cognition, our approach emphasizes differences among the likely evolutionary, fitness-enhancing functions of discrete emotions of the same va-lence and suggests that emotions of the same valence can have different consequences (Keltner, Ellsworth, & Edwards, ; Lerner & Keltner, ).

Despite the vast amount of research examining memory for emotional information, relatively little research has focused on how metamemory (i.e., the monitoring and control of memory) is influenced by emotion. Some general evidence (Tauber & Dunlosky, ; Zimmerman & Kelley, ), detailed below, suggests that learners’ predictions of recall can be sensitive to the emotional content Cited by:   Controversy still persists on whether emotional valence and arousal influence cognitive activities.

Our study sought to compare how these two factors foster the spread of activation within the semantic network.

In a lexical decision task, prime words were varied depending on the valence (pleasant or unpleasant) or on the level of emotional arousal (high or low).Cited by: 3. Emotional Processing and Episodic. Memory. Glen Howells. Department of Design, Engineering and Computing. Bournemouth University.

A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of Bournemouth University for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. March   Previous research suggests that emotional prosody processing is a highly rapid and complex process.

In particular, it has been shown that different basic emotions can be differentiated in an early event-related brain potential (ERP) component, the P Often, the P is followed by later long lasting ERPs such as the late positive complex.

The current experiment set out to explore in how far Cited by:. To date, the question remains open whether age-related differences in the elaborative processing of memory may be observed in a non-verbal channel of emotion communication such as music.

Third, to our knowledge, no previous study has investigated age differences in facial muscle activity when listening to by: These results suggest that the interaction between valence and arousal on the amygdala might occur within – ms. On the other hand, the N2 effects found in our study might reflect the valence-related influence on affective processing that has been attributed to the exertion of cognitive control on threat-related stimuli.In our studies, when the interaction between age and valence on memory performance occurs, it has been paralleled by an interaction between age and valence on recruitment of the medial prefrontal cortex (Kensinger & Schacter, ; Leclerc & Kensinger, ), a .